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Alex Rosenberg

Recent Posts

Jan
28
2020

What is Leukapheresis?

By Alex Rosenberg
Understanding Leukapheresis Leukapheresis is derived from the Latin words “leuk,” meaning white, and “aphaeresis,” meaning to take away.  Put together, leukapheresis describes the collection of leukocytes — also known as white blood cells or immune cells — using a Spectra Optia® system. A donor reclines in a chair and blood is drawn through a vein in one arm. An apheresis machine removes white blood cells from the superfluous biofluids, separates them based on density and collects them in a collection bag known as a leukopak. The remaining red blood cells and platelets are then returned to the same donor through a vein in their other arm. (The white blood cells that have been removed will be replaced quickly.) The white blood cells collected are frequently referred to as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and contain B cells, T cells, stem/progenitor cells and dendritic cells. Leukapheresis allows for a concentrated, pure method to obtain PBMCs from a single individual donor.
Dec
03
2019

Replace, Refine, Reduce:  The Humane Use of Animals in Research

By Alex Rosenberg
Replacement, refinement and reduction are the three Rs (often referred to as the 3Rs) that animal regulatory oversight committees around the world abide by. These principles, created over fifty years ago, advocate for the humane use of animals in research. A key proponent behind the 3Rs is the UK’s NC3R, whose efforts have led to the creation of laws in the UK and around the world. NC3R’s mission is to focus on the scientific impacts and benefits of animal research while ensuring humane treatment for animals.
Jul
31
2019

Three Species, Endless Possibilities

By Alex Rosenberg
Non-human primate, mouse, canine and rat are at the top of the list for animal model products purchased by scientists and researchers worldwide. Why? Their wide breadth of applications!  In 1902 William Castle started breeding mice for genetic studies. Over time, animals have been a major part of scientific research. While originally each species had their niche research areas, developments in technology and models have allowed the cross purposing of species, leading the way to better science.
Feb
27
2019

Are You Using the Correct Cells in Your Research? Different Types of Cells and Their Research Applications

By Alex Rosenberg
At BioIVT, our wide breadth of isolated cells allows us to touch many different areas of research. From oncology to autoimmune and everywhere in between, our capabilities cover a variety of disease indications and research applications. A struggle that researchers sometimes face is which cells to use in their studies and when to use them. Primary cells, dissociated tumor cells, immune cells, and cell lines all have their place in research. Some overlap but also have their own niche. Immortalized cell lines have been a popular research tool for over 50 years, and while they remain useful for researchers, advances in technology have allowed for the development of methods to isolate and culture other cell types that may be more appropriate for your research.
Dec
06
2018

What is HLA Typing And Why You Should Have Your Cells Genotyped?

By Alex Rosenberg
The human body uses Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) markers to identify which cells do and do not belong in your body via the recognition of antigens. Antigens are molecules capable of inducing an immune response, although not all do this. Antigens that belong in the body are recognized as ‘self’ and antigens that are not ‘self’ are recognized as ‘foreign’. As part of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), HLA proteins play an essential part in this process, making sure that cells and molecules that belong in your body are unharmed while those recognized as foreign, such as viruses, pathogens, and bacteria, are destroyed and removed
Sep
24
2018

The Rise in Respiratory Research: Increases in Disease and Illness Worldwide

By Alex Rosenberg
The investment in research and development activities focused on respiratory disease coincides with the rapidly increasing incidence of respiratory disease deaths. It is crucial that researchers have access to representative models for respiratory diseases that utilize ethically collected, well-characterized human specimens and comprehensive tissue-based research services.

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